We've heard there's a crumbling yellow list posted on the wall of the State Department's China Room warning its newly recruited analysts of signs they may have gone native and should seek professional help. Number six on that list is apparently ordering a second bowl of rice with dinner.

Depending on how long you've been in China, you're probably either shaking your head in disbelief at the mere possibility, or nodding your head in solemn agreement, because sometimes one bowl of rice just isn't enough. Which is why we're pleased to present you with information on the latest Chinese diet craze. In addition to helping keep the pounds off, this minor adjustment to your dining habits will keep you employable by the US government. Listen in for the details.
 said on
July 10, 2009
I triple-dipped on the rice once. This was at an upscale restaurant that offered us a "bo" of rice instead of a proper bowl. The third time I asked them to give me an actual bowl. The waitress was a bit taken aback.

Didn't understand why anyone would try to skimp you on the rice like that though. Even if you order another bowl they're only making an extra kuai. Two max. A heaping bowl of rice is the way to make customers happy. If the noodle shop on the corner can figure it out....
 said on
July 10, 2009
One thing that is interesting here in China are the various ways, methods, and superstitions that women use to lose weight. I'm sure men have their tactics too.

The most interesting one I've heard so far is how children react to unfair parents. I had a female friend of mine go on a hunger strike when she was 9 years old to demonstrate against her parents.

Also, the weather has an affect on the appetite. My roommate won't eat if it is too hot outside. I don't get that, maybe because I'm always hungry regardless of the temperature.

And yes Brendan you are right rice doesn't count as a dish.
 said on
July 11, 2009
我一为米饭是一个吃晚饭一后的东西,可是不是dessert。

Is this sentence correct?

Can anyone tell me about good Chinese word processors. The one I use came with the Word program and I am not sure if this is good as it gets. I input pinyin and pick the character. Isn't there an easier way to do this? On PCs it gives you more than one character for multiple syllable combinations.I have the MAC version of word 2003.
 said on
July 11, 2009
@luolin,

"我以为米饭是一个吃完饭以后吃的东西,可是它不是甜点" -- this should be the sentence :)

About good Chinese word processors, Brendan had one very good comment about it http://www.popupchinese.com/lessons/archive/announcements/adso-version-5065-released/discussion#comment-3070

See if it helps :)

--Echo

echo@popupchinese.com
 said on
September 26, 2009
So what else was on the State Department's list?

(I've Googled this, but all I can find is http://odeo.com/episodes/24773170-Absolute-Beginners-The-Chinese-Diet: suspiciously familiar).

 said on
June 27, 2012
我怎么说'has any one of you guys gone on a diet before?'All I can think of is..

你们的一个人有减肥呢?
 said on
June 27, 2012
@kay_kay1424,

有人减过肥嘛?

--Amber

amber@popupchinese.com
 said on
June 27, 2012
I see those weight-loss tea commercials all the time. The tagline:“减肥茶,不要太瘦哦!”

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FwibwbUNjSU

Like Brendan, I had a friend who used it. It worked--mostly because the tea made her go to the bathroom constantly. She lost a ton of water weight, but that's probably not the healthiest way to do things.
 said on
June 27, 2012
@murrayjames,

Yeah, I see that one commercial all the time too. The famous line is usually said by two skinny pretty girls.

Those 减肥茶 work pretty well on Brendan though... He's boney now @Brendan :D

--Echo

echo@popupchinese.com
 said on
June 28, 2012
Ok, Thanks Amber.
 said on
June 28, 2012
@kay_kay1424,

You're welcome.

--Amber

amber@popupchinese.com
 said on
July 14, 2012
不要太瘦哦: does this mean 'you can't be too thin'?

Also, is the 'you' 又? 又没了?
 said on
July 14, 2012
@xiaozhu, it literally means "don't be too skinny," but it the context of the ad, the adj. 瘦 meaning skinny, acts more like a verb as in "Don't get too skinny / Don't lose too much weight!" With the implied meaning that the tea is so good at making people lose weight that you might lose TOO MUCH weight. 他们可真会说废话啊!你要减肥,就得好好锻炼身体哟!
 said on
September 6, 2013
Is there a way to download without the initial "bleeping"? I would like my Chinese students to hear it as an example but because of the beginning I think the parents would 反对。

~I am a premium subscriber, btw.
 said on
September 6, 2013
Is there something offensive about the dialogue-only files? For the podcasts either keepthe volume low for five seconds, or maybe cut out the intros using Audacity? We've never had any interest from schools for kids, so this hasn't even been on our radar.

Suggestions? What do you guys need?

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