The world's cultural heritage had been incinerated along with its servers when the first bombs fell, and what little film stock survived had decayed in the years that followed as human society struggled to rebuild itself after the apocalypse. And yet here (here!) in this musty storehouse in Tibet, Xiao Wang had somehow stumbled across an astonishingly large collection of twentieth century cultural artifacts. Would it be enough to piece the past back into existence, and rediscover the fabled Thunderdome of yore?

This week on Popup Chinese, Echo, Gao and Tiansen conduct an exercise in cultural anthropology, attempting to piece together the plot of the film Mad Max Beyond Thunderdome from nothing more than the music video for Tina Turner's classic rock anthem "We Don't Need Another Hero". What is the film about? Why the excessive human hair? And how on earth does one say Thunderdome in Chinese anyway? For answers to these questions and more, check out today's show and let us know what you think in the comments section below.
 said on
March 29, 2012
中国人眼中的美国文化或者外国文化我觉得很有意思。我总是问我的中国朋友对外国文化有什么看法, 我尤其喜欢讨论他们觉得什么美国文化的方面很奇怪,我也不知道为什么。反正这个博客很酷阿。

 said on
March 29, 2012
@尼古拉斯桑

哈哈,谢谢!你以后也报道一下你和朋友讨论的文化内容吧,或者你觉得希望在泡泡中文看到的题材。

--Amber

amber@popupchinese.com
 said on
April 4, 2012
"The natives are getting restless."

or

"土著快脾气。"

“土著受不了了。”

or

“本地人要命”

 said on
April 4, 2012
@paglino9,

Any context?

--Echo

echo@popupchinese.com
 said on
April 4, 2012
@paglino9 - 土著起義了?

your name:

leave a comment: