It truly is the golden child in China, and its success has sparked countless imitators in the fiercely-competitive beverage market. Perhaps to some people, there really is no difference between the two. "They're the same thing," you'll hear restaurant staff tell you when you order. But you know in your heart that isn't true. So join us for a Chinese lesson that delves into knock-off culture in China. We'll teach you how to insist on getting the real thing, or at least hold out for a while.
 said on
October 8, 2010
What's "xian cheng duo"?
 said on
October 8, 2010
Ahh... the mighty 鲜橙多. As far as I can tell, it's artificial orange flavoring with sugar and water added for good effect. Arch rival of 每日C.

http://www.o-box.cn/#/intro

Apparently comes in four flavors! Not sure what the others are called.
 said on
October 10, 2010
Nice lesson. But I'm confused about "shang4ji4", as it is written in the transcript. Every time it was pronounced in the dialogue or by Echo in the discussion, I was hearing 'shangqi'. I tried looking it up in two dictionaries in every way I could think in both pinyin and English, but to no avail.
 said on
October 11, 2010
Yes, it is shang4qi2. There must be a mistake in the transcript. I'll get it fixed now. Thanks for the heads up.

--david
 said on
October 11, 2010
How come hao3lei is just a single character in the pdf? Is there no character for lei?
 said on
October 11, 2010
hmmmm... the character is 嘞. It looks like our pdf system has a problem with that character -- happens when the font used doesn't contain a particular character. I'll look into it, but I'm not sure there is a quick fix for this. :(

--dave

 said on
October 11, 2010
Hi! Just had another look at the transcript and see that further down in the vocab section the pinyin is correct. Wish I had noticed that earlier!
 said on
October 11, 2010
It was our bad Susan. I remembered fixing that when we first put out the lesson, but perhaps the network was down and the edit didn't take for some reason. Anyway -- thanks for the continued support here as elsewhere and sorry for the confusion. For what it's worth, this word was somewhat new to me too. I'd always assumed people were saying 上起.
 said on
June 4, 2012
Like the helpful transcript notes in this one :-)

I've never had 果粒橙, though I almost bought it by mistake once. It looks a lot like old-school bottles of Minute Maid.
 said on
June 4, 2012
@murrayjames,

Haha, you didn't miss much. 别担心 :)

--Echo

echo@popupchinese.com

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